The Latest: The latest developments in the US elections

(AP file)
(AP file)

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Latest on Election Day 2016 (all times EST):

11:44 p.m.

Kate Brown has been re-elected governor of Oregon over Republican newcomer Bud Pierce.

Brown became governor in February 2015 after the resignation of John Kitzhaber over an influence-peddling scandal. Brown was then secretary of state and next in line to succeed him.

Tuesday’s gubernatorial vote was a special election to fill the remainder of Kitzhaber’s four-year term.

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11:43 p.m.

Donald Trump’s victory in Ohio demonstrates the Republican nominee’s ability to energize working-class voters outside of America’s largest cities.

Mahoning County stands out as a working-class county where organized labor still maintains political clout. Trump didn’t win the county that surrounds Youngstown. But he might as well have.

Hillary Clinton won by just 3 percentage points and less than 3,500 votes. Four years ago, President Barack Obama outpaced Mitt Romney by almost 25,000 votes on his way to a 28-point margin in the county. Clinton fell more than 20,000 votes shy of Obama’s total.

Youngstown is represented in Congress by a Democrat who offers some of the same populist appeal to labor as Trump. But those loyalties to Rep. Tim Ryan apparently didn’t transfer to Clinton.

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11:37 p.m.

Republican Lt. Gov. Phil Scott has won election as governor of Vermont.

He defeated Democrat Sue Minter.

The popular construction company executive and part-time race-car driver had served three two-year terms as Vermont’s part-time lieutenant governor. He was previously in the state Senate.

Scott takes over in January from Democratic Gov. Peter Shumlin, who decided not to seek a fourth two-year term.

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11:36 p.m.

The crowd at Donald Trump’s election watch party is jubilant as returns continue to roll in putting him closer to 270 Electoral College votes.

Supporters packed into a hotel ballroom in midtown Manhattan are breaking into chants of “USA!” and embracing each other in groups.

Others are breaking into song, bellowing “God Bless America” at the top of their lungs.

The screens in the ballroom are turned to Fox News. When the station shows images of Clinton’s election headquarters, the room breaks into boos and chants of one of Trump’s slogans: “Drain the swamp!”

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11:33 p.m.

Donald Trump has won Georgia.

The Republican nominee on Tuesday was awarded its 16 electoral votes.

Trump now has 232 electoral votes while his Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton has 209.

The Democrats had some hopes that changing demographics in Georgia could allow then to flip the reliably Republican state but their efforts fell short.

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11:29 p.m.

Hillary Clinton has won Washington state and its 12 electoral votes.

The victory in Tuesday’s elections brings the former secretary of state’s electoral vote total to 209. Republican Donald Trump has 216.

It takes 270 votes to win the presidency.

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11:15 p.m.

California voters passed a ballot measure to legalize the recreational use of marijuana, giving a big boost to the campaign to end the drug’s national prohibition.

Adults older than 21 can legally possess up to an ounce of marijuana and grow six plants.

California was one of five states where votes were considering the legalization of recreational marijuana Tuesday. Four other states were considering measures to legalize medicinal marijuana.

So far, voters in Florida and North Dakota have also passed marijuana measures Tuesday.

Collectively, it’s the closest the U.S. has ever come to national referendum on marijuana.

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11:15 p.m.

Arizona voters have booted Sheriff Joe Arpaio from office in his bid for a seventh term after his legal problems in a racial profiling case culminated in a criminal charge two weeks before Election Day.

The 84-year-old Republican became a national figure by cracking down on illegal immigration and forcing jail inmates to wear pink underwear. He lost to Democrat Paul Penzone on Tuesday.

The race became a referendum on Arpaio’s legal woes. Federal prosecutors brought a contempt-of-court charge stemming from his defiance of a judge’s order to stop carrying out patrols targeting Latinos.

Arpaio has faced criminal investigations in the past without being charged or losing his seat. That changed Tuesday despite a devoted base of supporters and strong fundraising, mainly from out-of-state donors.

He still faces the possibility of jail time.

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11:11 p.m.

Donald Trump has won battleground North Carolina and its 15 electoral votes.

The victory in Tuesday’s elections brings the billionaire’s electoral vote total to 216. Democrat Hillary Clinton has 197.

North Carolina was one of the hardest-fought contests of the election and is one of the map’s newest swing states. It consistently went for Republicans until Barack Obama captured it in 2008. Republican Mitt Romney narrowly won the state in 2012.

At least 270 electoral votes are needed to win the presidency.

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11:06 p.m.

Hillary Clinton has won Oregon.

The Democratic nominee on Tuesday was awarded its seven electoral votes.

Clinton now has 197 electoral votes. Her Republican opponent Donald Trump has 201.

Several key battleground states have yet to be won.

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11 p.m.

Hillary Clinton has won California and Hawaii. Donald Trump has won Idaho’s four electoral votes.

The results in the West bring Clinton’s electoral vote total to 190 and Trump’s to 201. It takes 270 votes to win the presidency.

The results were not surprising. California, with 55 electoral votes, has voted for Democrats beginning in 1992. Hawaii has chosen Democrats consistently since 1988.

Idaho has voted for Republicans beginning in 1968.

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10:50 p.m.

Donald Trump has won the key battleground state of Florida.

Trump on Tuesday was awarded 29 electoral votes.

He now has 197 electoral votes. His Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton has 131.

Both candidates have spent an extraordinary amount of time in Florida, one of the most important prizes on the map. Trump calls Florida his “second home” and his campaign acknowledged that a win there is vital to his White House hopes.

Barack Obama captured the Sunshine State in both 2008 and 2012.

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10:43 p.m.

Hillary Clinton has won Colorado.

The Democratic nominee captured its nine electoral votes Tuesday. She now has 131 total electoral votes while her Republican opponent Donald Trump has 168.

Colorado has become an attainable state for Democrats in recent years thanks to shifting demographics.

Clinton tried to woo a surge in Latino voters and the state’s college-educated whites while Trump repeatedly made pitches to Colorado’s large military population and swaths of rural voters.

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10:40 p.m.

Hillary Clinton has won Virginia.

The Democratic nominee has captured its 13 electoral votes.

Virginia was reliably Republican for decades until Barack Obama won it twice, thanks in part to huge turnout from Washington, D.C.’s suburbs. Clinton’s running mate, Tim Kaine, is a senator from Virginia, though Trump made a late push in the state.

The victory gives her 122 electoral votes. Her Republican opponent Donald Trump has 168.

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10:37 p.m.

Donald Trump has won the electoral prize of Ohio, a state known for picking presidents.

The Republican wins the state’s 18 electoral votes in Tuesday’s election, bringing his total to 168. Hillary Clinton has 109.

Clinton had appeared ready to concede Ohio’s 18 electoral votes to Trump as polls showed him pulling ahead even in some traditionally Democratic blue-collar areas. But Trump struggled after release of a video in which he talked about groping women and kissing them without their permission.

Republicans held their nominating convention in Cleveland. Governor and one-time Republican presidential rival John Kasich refused to endorse Trump.

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10:25 p.m.

Donald Trump has won Missouri.

The Republican nominee was awarded its 10 electoral votes. The result was not as a surprise, as the last Democratic victory in the Show Me State came in 1996.

Trump now has 150 electoral votes. His Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton has 109.

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10:21 p.m.

Hillary Clinton has won New Mexico and its five electoral votes.

That brings her electoral college vote total in Tuesday’s election to 109. Republican Donald Trump has 140 votes.

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10 p.m.

Republican Gary Herbert has been re-elected governor of Utah.

Herbert had a strong advantage in Tuesday’s elections and was considered the favorite in the conservative state. But many Utah conservatives were not enthused about GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump. And Herbert had vacillated on his support for the New York billionaire.

Herbert has been in office since 2009 and had been challenged by Democrat Mike Weinholtz, a wealthy former CEO of a medical staffing company.

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10 p.m.

Donald Trump has won Montana.

The Republican presidential nominee on Tuesday was awarded the state’s three electoral votes.

The result was not a surprise, as Montana was considered a safely Republican state.

Trump now has 132 electoral votes. His Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton has 104 votes.

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9:40 p.m.

Preliminary exit polls show the racial divides that were expected to define the 2016 presidential election.

Polls conducted for national media by Edison Research show Republican Donald Trump winning a majority of white voters while Democrat Hillary Clinton is drawing support from about three out of four nonwhite voters.

Trump’s support is strongest among whites without a college degree. He’s winning nearly two-thirds of them. Whites with college degrees are split between Trump and Clinton. Trump is winning both among white men and white women, though his margin is much higher among men.

Clinton’s strongest support comes from African-Americans. She’s winning about nine out of 10 black voters. She’s winning about two out of three Hispanics and Asian-Americans.

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9:30 p.m.

Republican Donald Trump is maintaining Republicans’ advantage among white voters nationwide, but perhaps not by the usual margin that the party’s nominees have enjoyed.

Preliminary exit polls of voters who have already cast presidential ballots show Trump winning a majority of whites. He has not quite reached the roughly six-out-of-10 share that Mitt Romney notched four years ago in his unsuccessful challenge of President Barack Obama.

The difference appears to come among white women. Trump is posting about the same, if not a slightly wider margin among white men as Romney did in 2012. But his lead over Clinton among white women appears to be in single digits, short of Romney’s double-digit advantage four years ago.

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9:28 p.m.

Donald Trump has won Louisiana and its eight electoral votes.

That extends his Electoral College total in Tuesday’s elections to 137, compared with Hillary Clinton’s 104.

History was on Donald Trump’s side in the state. Louisiana hasn’t given its electoral votes to a Democrat since Bill Clinton won 52 percent of the vote two decades ago.

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9:26 p.m.

Hillary Clinton has won Connecticut.

The Democratic nominee on Tuesday was awarded Connecticut’s seven electoral votes.

The result was not a surprise, as Connecticut was considered a safely Democratic state.

Clinton now has 104 electoral votes. Her Republican opponent Donald Trump has 129.

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9:15 p.m.

Republican Eric Holcomb has won the governor’s race in Indiana and Democrat Jim Justice has won the governor’s race in West Virginia.

Holcomb defeated Democrat John Gregg in Tuesday’s election and will succeed Gov. Mike Pence. Pence is presidential candidate Donald Trump’s vice presidential running mate.

In West Virginia, Gregg defeated state Senate President Bill Cole.
8:51 p.m.

Donald Trump has won Mississippi and its six electoral votes.

That brings his Electoral College total in Tuesday’s election to 66, compared with Hillary Clinton’s 48.

The outcome was not unexpected. Mississippi has voted for Republicans in every presidential election starting with 1972, with the exception of Democrat Jimmy Carter in 1976.

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8:40 p.m.

Hillary Clinton has won Rhode Island and its four electoral votes.

That brings her total Tuesday to 48, compared with Donald Trump’s 60.

It takes 270 electoral votes to win the presidency.

Rhode Island has voted for Republicans for president only four times since 1928.

In 2012, President Barack Obama defeated Republican Mitt Romney in the state by about 27 percent.

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8:33 p.m.

Exit polls conducted by Edison Research for national media outlets suggest Hillary Clinton is still struggling with white voters who have put Georgia in the Republican column for every presidential election but one since 1980.

Exit polls in Virginia show Clinton and Republican Donald Trump split white Virginia voters with college degrees. In North Carolina, Trump apparently won a slight majority of college-educated whites. But in Georgia, whites with college degrees sided with Trump by more than 2-to-1.

Among whites with no degree, the gaps were even wider. Trump won about two out of three of those voters in North Carolina and Virginia. In Georgia, he won about four out of five.

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8:27 p.m.

Donald Trump has won Alabama and its nine electoral votes after Sen. Jeff Sessions endorsed the billionaire candidate.

That brings Trump’s total in the Electoral College to 60 votes, to Clinton’s 44 votes.

It takes 270 votes to win the presidency.

The results continue the state’s streak of voting for Republicans every presidential election since 1980.

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8:25 p.m.

A mariachi band has serenaded Donald Trump on the sidewalk outside Trump Tower in New York City.

The group of men in big white sombreros paraded down the sidewalk Tuesday across the street from the skyscraper playing horns and guitars.

The vibrant performance interrupted a mostly low-energy night outside Trump headquarters.

A separate group of about five Trump backers marched along the sidewalk across from the midtown Manhattan hotel where Trump is expected to address supporters later Tuesday night. They chanted, “Lock her up!” as they marched behind police barricades.

A group of enterprising vendors also patrolled the outside of the hotel, selling Trump buttons, shirts and hats.

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8:25 p.m.

Texas authorities say they arrested a man who claimed to be working for Donald Trump for voter fraud.

Phillip Cook, Jr. was arrested after trying to vote for a second time at a polling station in an unincorporated area outside of Houston on Tuesday. Fort Bend County Sheriff Troy Nehls says Cook told poll officials and sheriff’s deputies that he was helping the Trump campaign and testing election security.

Nehls said Cook was booked on suspicion of a felony charge.

Trump has alleged widespread voter fraud and that there are insufficient safeguards to protect the integrity of the election.

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8:13 p.m.

Donald Trump has won Tennessee and its 11 electoral votes.

Tuesday’s vote is the fifth presidential contest in a row in which the state voted for the Republican candidate. That includes the 2000 election, when native son Al Gore lost the state to Republican George W. Bush.

It takes 270 votes to win the presidency.

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8:10 p.m.

An election watchdog says some voters were denied provisional ballots at several polling stations in Atlanta.

Georgia Election Protection coalition spokesman Harold Franklin says poll mangers refused to provide provisional ballots to voters Tuesday. He says the group received reports that voters were given no reason for being refused.

Franklin claims voters who are eligible or entitled to a provisional ballot were denied. He did not know the number of voters who were refused, but said the bulk occurred in Fulton County.

Franklin says he spoke with Fulton County election officials, who he said told polling managers to provide voters with ballots. The Fulton County elections office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Election Protection is organized by the Lawyers Committee for Civils Rights Under Law.

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8:09 p.m.

Donald Trump has won South Carolina.

The Republican nominee was awarded the state’s nine electoral votes, giving him 40 for the night. The result was expected as the state has long been a Republican stronghold.

8:08 p.m.

Democratic Rep. John Carney has won the Delaware governor’s race eight years after losing his first bid to become the state’s chief executive.

Carney easily defeated Republican state Sen. Colin Bonini of Dover in Tuesday’s gubernatorial contest. The victory was driven by voter registration numbers that heavily favor Democrats.

Carney has said job creation and economic development will be among his top priorities, along with improving Delaware’s public education system.

He also has acknowledged that the next governor faces significant challenges given troubling revenue expectations and escalating costs for Medicaid and state employee health care.

Carney will succeed Jack Markell, who defeated Carney in the 2008 Democratic gubernatorial primary.

Carney previously served as lieutenant governor.

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8:05 p.m.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan has written in his father, former Rep. Lawrence Hogan, as his choice to be president.

Doug Mayer, Hogan’s spokesman, said Tuesday the Republican governor voted early.

Hogan has been saying for months that he wasn’t going to support Republican Donald Trump. He has said he has been extremely disappointed in the candidates from both major parties.

Mayer says the governor decided to write in the name of the person who taught him what it meant to hold public office with integrity.

8 p.m.

Democrat Hillary Clinton has won Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, Delaware and the District of Columbia while Republican Donald Trump has captured Oklahoma.

Clinton was awarded Massachusetts’ 11 electoral votes, 10 from Maryland, 14 from New Jersey and three each from Delaware and the nation’s capital, giving her 44 for the night. Trump picked up seven from Oklahoma, giving him 31.

The results Tuesday were not surprising. Massachusetts and the District of Columbia are two of the nation’s safest Democratic strongholds.

The last time Oklahoma went for a Democrat was 1964, when it voted for Lyndon Johnson. Maryland last went for the GOP in 1988.

New Jersey has been a safe Democratic state for 20 years. Its governor, Chris Christie, is a close Trump ally but is saddled with low approval numbers.

7:35 p.m.

The North Carolina Board of Elections has agreed to extend voting in eight precincts in Durham County, where Democrats have a 4-to-1 registration advantage over Republicans.

The state board voted 3-2 Tuesday night to extend voting by an hour in two precincts most affected by a computer glitch. The problem forced poll workers to check for registered voters on paper printouts, causing long lines at some locations.

The board says six more precincts can stay open for a shorter time.

The NAACP’s North Carolina chapter had asked for the eight precincts to stay open for 90 extra minutes. Hillary Clinton’s campaign also supported keeping the polls open later in Durham.

Two groups filed lawsuits seeking to keep the polls open, but a state superior court judge declined to intervene.

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7:32 p.m.

North Carolina got more attention than usual this election, and exit polls show why.

Exit polls conducted by Edison Research for national media outlets suggest a tight finish between Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump for the state’s 15 electoral votes.

The polls suggest a majority of men back Trump, while Clinton won a majority among women — with the margins essentially even. The polls suggest women made up slightly more of the electorate.

About four out of five nonwhite voters backed Clinton, while about six out of 10 white voters supported Trump. But the exit polls don’t offer definitive information about actual turnout among those groups, with the estimates again pointing to a close finish.

7:30 p.m.

Republican Donald Trump has won West Virginia and its five electoral votes.

The Mountain State was one of the billionaire’s biggest supporters in the Republican primary. He is popular for promising to bring back coal jobs. Hillary Clinton had largely been largely shunned for making comments perceived as an affront to the industry.

The dynamic has resulted in one of the few states where Republicans didn’t shy from the brash businessman and instead looked to ride his coattails. Many Democrats for congressional and other races scrambled to distance themselves from Clinton and refused to endorse her.

West Virginia has voted for Republican presidential candidates in each of the last four presidential races.

It takes 270 electoral votes to win the presidency.

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7:15 p.m.

Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams says he has found no evidence of fraud or intimidation at the city’s polls despite Republican candidate Donald Trump’s warnings about voter fraud.

Williams says no major problems have emerged among the 68 complaints his office investigated during the first half of Election Day.

Meantime, several Pennsylvania counties are reporting a handful of complaints about touchscreen machines switching votes. They say the machines are quickly being re-calibrated to fix the problem.

Pennsylvania Secretary of State Pedro Cortes says the GOP reported problems with about 25 machines, out of nearly 24,000 deployed statewide. He says in all cases votes ended up being recorded correctly.

State GOP Chairman Rob Gleason says he doesn’t see anything “nefarious” in the apparent vote switching on older machines.

7:10 p.m.

Vast divides of race, gender and education are keeping the presidential race in two tightly fought southern states close shortly after polls close.

In both Virginia and Georgia, about 9 in 10 black voters and two-thirds of Hispanics backed Clinton, while most whites backed Trump.

That’s according to exit polls conducted by Edison Research for national media outlets.

In Georgia, large majorities of whites with and without college degrees backed Trump. In Virginia those two groups diverged. Whites without a college degree backed Trump by a large margin, while those with a degree split their votes between the two major-party candidates.

Women in both states were far more likely than men to back Clinton. Majorities of women in both states said Trump’s treatment of women bothers them a lot.

___

7 p.m.

Republican Donald Trump has won Kentucky and Indiana while Democrat Hillary Clinton has won Vermont.

Trump was awarded Kentucky’s eight electoral votes and Indiana’s 11. Vermont gives Clinton three. These are the first states to be decided Tuesday in the 2016 general election.

The wins were expected.

Vermont has voted for a Democrat every election since 1988, while Kentucky has gone Republican every cycle since 2000.

Indiana is normally a Republican stronghold but went for President Barack Obama in 2008. The Republicans captured it again in 2012 and Trump’s running mate, Mike Pence, is the state’s governor.

The winning candidate needs 270 electoral votes.

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6:45 p.m.

Americans who have voted already in the presidential election appear to be evenly divided on the benefits of international trade.

According to an exit poll conducted by Edison Research for national media outlets, about four out of 10 voters believe trade among nations creates jobs. Another four out of 10 say it takes jobs from Americans.

Republican nominee Donald Trump has railed against decades of U.S. trade policy and has energized working-class voters with his promises to create more jobs at home. Democrat Hillary Clinton has historically supported U.S. trade deals, including as secretary of state.

But she has backed off her support for the Trans-Pacific Partnership. President Barack Obama’s trade agreement with Pacific Rim nations is still pending.

___

6:40 p.m.

OK, so forget those ballot box selfies. Bring on the “I voted” stickers!

Stuck to noses, dogs and children, the stickers are front and center on social media, including many customized by cities and states. Others were served generic designs of stars and flags.

New York City went with the Statue of Liberty. In Tennessee, there were red stickers in the shape of the state. Some Georgia voters got an orange peach, and in parts of Virginia, a fancy eagle emblem was encircled in yellow.

One of the most impressive stickers may have belonged to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where stickers featured one of the famous Blue Dogs painted by New Iberia native George Rodrigue.

But alas, not everyone went home with a sticker. Some polls ran out, prompting some to express their sadness on social media as well.

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6:35 p.m.

A majority of Americans who have cast ballots already are at odds with Republican Donald Trump on two of his signature immigration proposals.

According to the preliminary results of exit polling conducted by Edison Research for The Associated Press and television networks, just four out of 10 voters say they support building a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. A majority oppose the idea.

About seven out of 10 people who have voted already say they’d rather allow workers in the U.S. illegally have a way to apply for legal status than have them deported. About a quarter of voters support deportation.

Trump fueled his rise to the Republican nomination with his promise to build a border wall and deport millions of residents in the U.S. illegally.

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6:25 p.m.

Hillary Clinton is thanking members of a Facebook group called “Pantsuit Nation.”

In a message Tuesday, Clinton said the group, which was named for her signature apparel, provides a special place for supporters to build a community. She said that “for some of you, it’s been difficult to feel like you could wear your support on your sleeve.”

Clinton also joked about the group’s moniker, saying “have you ever heard a better name?!”

The Democratic presidential nominee said she was hopeful she would win the presidential contest. If she does, she said she wants “to use those pantsuits for the best occasion of all — celebrating.”

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6:05 p.m.

Guests are beginning to gather at Donald Trump’s election night party in midtown Manhattan.

The GOP nominee is holding his event in the grand ballroom of a midtown Hilton hotel, where a stage has been decorated with dozens of American and state flags.

Trump’s campaign has also set up museum-style glass displays around the venue holding campaign merchandise, including his iconic “Make America Great Again” hats and pins.

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6 p.m.

More than half of Americans who went to the polls earlier Tuesday say Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton has the temperament to serve as president. About a third of voters say the same about Republican nominee Donald Trump.

But neither candidate can claim a mandate as the honest candidate according to the preliminary results of exit polling conducted by Edison Research for The Associated Press and television networks.

About six out of 10 voters say they don’t view Clinton as honest. About the same proportion say Trump isn’t honest. About three out of 10 voters say they believe neither candidate is honest.

As for what percentage of voters think both nominees are honest, that number is in single digits.

___

5:55 p.m.

The Colorado Secretary of State’s voter registration system went down for nearly 30 minutes during midday voting Tuesday.

The failure forced in-person voters to cast provisional ballots, and some county clerks were unable to process mail ballots that needed to have the signature verified.

Tauna Lockhart, spokeswoman for the state information technology office, says the system came back up about 3:20 p.m. She says the incident is under investigation by state officials, but there is no evidence the network was hit by hackers.

She says the IT office has been monitoring its network for activity and said “there were no blips or anything.”

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5:40 p.m.

Police say they arrested two women after they took off their tops in protest at the Manhattan polling place used by Donald Trump.

The disruption occurred Tuesday morning at a grade school gym about two hours before Trump arrived.

The women began shouting and took off their tops to reveal anti-Trump slogans painted across their bare chests before police escorted then away.

They were released after being given summonses for electioneering, a violation of rules outlawing political activity at polls.

___

5:37 p.m.

At least 2,000 people are already waiting inside the New York City convention center where Hillary Clinton is scheduled to hold her election night party.

Most people are sitting on the floor in an area the size of an airplane hangar. A handful of women are wearing pantsuits to honor Clinton.

Barnard College senior Madeline Walsh is wearing a black pantsuit. She says the garment means its wearer is more than just a woman.

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5:35 p.m.

A spokesman says former President George W. Bush did not vote for Republican Donald Trump or Democrat Hillary Clinton.

Freddy Ford says the most recent Republican president voted “none of the above for president and Republican down-ballot.” That means Bush voted for Republicans in congressional and local races.

It’s not a complete surprise. The Bush family includes the two most recent Republican presidents but neither endorsed nor campaigned for the billionaire businessman who captured the party’s nomination. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush was a one-time favorite to win the GOP presidential nomination until Trump got into the race and branded him with a name that stuck: “Low energy.”

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5:30 p.m.

Preliminary presidential exit polls results suggest that a clear majority of Americans going to the polls Tuesday have at least a moderate amount of confidence that votes will be counted accurately.

About half of those polled for The Associated Press and television networks told Edison Research they are very confident in the results. Another third said they are somewhat confident.

Fewer than one out of five say they’re not very confident or at all confident in the vote count.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has railed against the electoral system. He’s called it rigged and suggested without evidence there is widespread voter fraud that could affect the outcome.

___

5:25 p.m.

Just more than half of voters going to the polls Tuesday approve of the job President Barack Obama is doing. But a majority is still upset with the way the federal government is working.

That’s according to preliminary results of the exit poll conducted for The Associated Press and television networks by Edison Research.

Just under half of those surveyed say they’re dissatisfied with the government’s performance. About a quarter say they’re angry.

About four out of 10 voters said the top quality they’re looking for in a candidate is change. That outranks good judgment, the right experience and caring about people like you as the preferred qualities in a president.

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